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Resilient Communities for America:   Private Funding in Uncertain Times

by Sherie Sanders on March 6, 2017
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 Waterfall in an Article About Grants for Resilient CommunitiesAt this point, no one knows what the future holds for the Environmental Protection Agency. What we do know is that in FY 2016, it awarded approximately $3.9 billion in grants to Native American tribes, state and local governments, and nonprofit organizations. While foundation funding may never be able to fill a void that large, it is still prudent to know what alternatives exist in the private realm for environmental projects. We bring you two foundation grants: The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Wells Fargo and Company Resilient Communities program, and the Enterprise Community Partners: Climate and Cultural Resilience Grants, which both focus on protecting the environment as a way to create strong, resilient communities.

 

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Wells Fargo Resilient Communities

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation has partnered with Wells Fargo to help communities resist natural disasters and the anticipated impacts associated with water quantity and quality issues, forest conservation and sea-level rise. Special emphasis will be placed on helping underserved and moderate-income communities build capacity for resiliency planning and green infrastructure. Five to ten grants will be awarded annually for a period of four years.

 

Two Categories
  • Category 1: Adaptation Through Regional Conservation Projects. Grants in this category will range from $200,000 to $500,000 in each of the three designated regions. It supports projects that help prepare for fire in the West, floods and droughts in the Central Region, and sea-level rise on the East Coast. Refer to the NOFA for specific project types that are eligible in each of the three regions. Special consideration will be given to projects that focus on the interconnectedness of the environment and community well-being.

 

  • Category 2: Community Capacity Building and Demonstration Projects. Grants in this category will range from $100,000 to $250,000. It supports projects that help improve resilience via enhanced natural features. The project should address multiple cities and communities. Refer to the NOFA for specific project types under this category. Special consideration will be given to projects that benefit low and moderate income neighborhood groups and build a sense of community.

 

Applying for the Grant

Eligible applicants are Native American tribes, local governments and nonprofits. The pre proposal is due by March 30, 2017 and must be submitted online at Easygrants.nfwf.org. Successful applicants will be invited to submit a full proposal which is due on May 31, 2017.

 

Enterprise Community Partners: Climate and Cultural Resilience Grants

 

Can creative placemaking be the bridge between cultural and climate resilience? Enterprise defines creative placemaking as the practice that weaves art, culture and creativity into community development in order to strengthen the social fabric. In 2017, it is offering five grants of $100,000 each. Applicants will identify a local climate resilience challenge and come up with ways residents can mitigate it while simultaneously addressing racial equity, socio-economic disparities and community engagement. Examples of eligible projects include, but are not limited to:

  • Stormwater infrastructure that incorporates artistic and educational elements
  • Community-driven cultural assets mapping for neighborhood resilience plans
  • Solar-powered neighborhood utilities
  • Rain barrels for storage and flood reduction
  • Build a bike workshops
  • Collaborations that support resilient food systems

 

Applying for the Grant

Applicants who are not in Native American or rural communities must be in the funding agency's local market. Native American tribes and tribal organizations, community development corporations and community development housing organizations are eligible to apply. Proposals are due by March 31, 2017.

 

 

 

Madison, West Virginia, eCivis Client Case Study in Economic DevelopmentImage courtesy of Timothy Tiernan.

Topics: Environment